They vary in function in different languages. Pronouns: accusative, dative, genitive. I wouldn't say that French has an accusative. and so on. I was definitely struggling but your definition made it crystal clear. Pronouns as direct objects: accusative When pronouns are used as direct objects, they appear in the accusative form. I ate some pie. The accusative is the direct object of a transitive verb. Genitive: no cat. But I plan to come back strong and can say that I am glad to be a part of this community! αι μῑκραὶ ἦσαν. These relationships can be expressed by the English prepositions to or for, with or by, and in or at. There are five noun cases in koine Greek: the nominative, genitive, dative, accusative and vocative. Noun cases are formed by putting the ‘stem’ of the noun with an ‘ending’. The nominative is used as the subject of the sentence and also as the object of sentences with the verb 'to be'. The only thing that indicates the direct object is the word order, just as the case of English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and, I imagine other Romance languages (although English is not a Romance language). According to their function in a sentence, their form changes to one of the five cases (nominative, vocative, accusative, genitive, or dative). There are four different case forms in Greek. 10. accusative - … So try saying to yourselves: Cat's house I see a cat. Serbian language, for example, has seven cases (4 mentioned above plus dative, instrumental and locative. The genitive expresses the relationships between nouns and can usually be trans… The four cases are Nominative, Genitive, Dative, and Accusative. Accusative: I see a cat. Here is what they look like in English: nominative - subject. The dative is is used for three purposes: relationships of place where and time when. However, the locative is limited to few nouns: generally names of cities, small islands and a few other words. In English, readers rely on the order in which words appear in a sentence to indicate the grammatical function of each word. In Ancient Greek, their case tells the reader the grammatical function of each word in the sentence. Although it is alien to speakers of modern English, Old English (Anglo-Saxon) did have this aspect. And many linguists believe that it's present in modern. There are probably others, but one's enough for me. I'm so surprised that I helped so much and I appreciate the compliments. I sadly haven't had much time for Greek *tear* and have forgot a lot. nominative, genitive, accusative, vocative, Re: nominative, genitive, accusative, vocative. In french there is accusative, which is (for any of you who speaks french) le complement d'objet direct ou indirect. 2. Nominative, accusative, dative and genitive are all grammatical cases. My mothertongue is Russian and we have 6 cases. Hey everybody. There are 6 distinct cases in Latin: Nominative, Genitive, Dative, Accusative, Ablative, and Vocative; and there are vestiges of a seventh, the Locative. When I was a kid, the teacher taught us the easier way to put any noun in any case you want. Nominative: the cat. what is ths diffrence between these? A complete Latin noun declension consists of up to seven grammatical cases: nominative, vocative, accusative, genitive, dative, ablative and locative. In the last section, we discussed the Greek cases, the use of pronouns, and nominative pronouns. 29. The vocative is for exclamations and emphatic address. 1) The nominative case is used for the subject of a sentence. The nominative is used as the subject of the sentence and also as the object of sentences with the verb 'to be'. Here, I would be in the nominative since it is I that was doing the verb (eating). Dative: gave to a cat. Following is a discussion of these four different cases. English pronouns actually decline in three of these cases: Oh, Irish Gaelic also has the vocative case (that just occurred to me). Ancient russian had a vocative case. Thanks! The set of forms that a noun will take for each case and number is determined by the declension that it follows. You made me curious, so in a brief search for another language with a vocative case, I found Sansiboli which is some language of India that's not used very much at all. You're not alone when it comes to difficulty in understanding this. The case form is shown by the ending of the word. Although it does have a direct object, the form of the word does not change. The genitive expresses the relationships between nouns and can usually be translated along with the English word 'of' or 'from'. e.g. Yes, many slavic languages have vocative (as far as I remember, Russian doesn't have it). In Ancient Greek, all nouns are classified according to grammatical gender (masculine, feminine, are used in a number (singular, dual, or plural). Michael Woodcox has done a brillant job of explaining the cases except in one respect. This lesson continues our discussion of pronouns, focusing on accusative, dative, and genitive. it makes me really mad and i can't figure it out. The basic descriptions that follow are also found on the pages introducing the more detailed descriptions of the cases, which you may reach by clicking the case names in the prior sentence. May be this will help. The apostle sees the prophet. Today we will start our look at the nominative case. 1. μῑκραὶ ἦσαν αἱ θύραι τῶν οἰκιῶν. I have finally returned from a hectic year of school, work, etc...and it feels good to be back. Ο απόστολος βλέπει τον προφήτην. There are five CASES in Greek, the nominative, genitive,dative, accusative, and vocative. 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